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20 Artists from Art Basel We'll Be Following into 2018

20 Artists from Art Basel We'll Be Following into 2018

Meghan Murphy

Art Basel is long gone. Scott Disick went home. The Miami spectacle of sun, celebrity, fashion, and $$$ may have faded, but gosh darn it, the artists deserve remembering. We vow to follow these 20 artists wherever they go, into the new year and beyond. Join us, won't you?    


1.) Andy Dixon

Follow: @andy.dxn

This punk boy turned art darling makes paintings about making paintings for rich people, and even as a non-rich person,
Andy is my darling too!

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Title: How much do they cost?

Left: Versace 1 & Right: Versace 2

BEERS LONDON GALLERY


 

2.) Melissa Leandro

Follow: @melissaleandro89

I can't get enough of Melissa's giant woven tapestries. From her artist statement: "Leandro's woven and embroidered surfaces explore her composite cultural identity through means of intuitive mark-making. Reflecting on her past and present travels, she considers the impact of these environments on the fragmentation of identity and place."

Left: Zigzag Field & Right: In the queue

ANDREW RAFACZ GALLERY


3.) Joan Brown

Follow: @joanbrownestate
 

Few artists can paint more human imagery than the late Joan Brown—especially with her human-animal hybrids.

 
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Bathers

ANGLIM GILBERT GALLERY


4.) Trish Tillman

Follow: @trish.tillman

This art potion made of horse hair, chains, and vinyl has us under a spell! According to Trish's artist statement, her work aims to stir feelings of "domestic ritual, fetish, and a modern tendency towards private totemic monuments."

Left: Recurring Nova & Right: In Aspect

ASYA GEISBERG GALLERY


5.) GUY YANAI

Follow: @guy_yanai

Guy's intimate, domestic imagery feels at once digital and painterly. Not to mention Guy's eye for color and plant life woos my little millennial heart. 

Left: Hydra Corner & Right: Palermo Street

CONRADS GALLERY 


6.) Deborah Roberts

Follow: @rdeborah191

Deborah's work champions the power of young Black girls. All I can say is hooray! Hooray! More! More! I can't get enough. 

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Untitled Lost Girl

 

"Having one’s identity dismantled, marginalized, and regulated to non-human status demands action. This led me to critically engage image-making in art history and pop culture, and ultimately grapple with whatever power and authority these images have over the female figure."

—Deborah Roberts's artist statement 

 
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She's might mighty

FORT GANSEVOORT GALLERY


7.) Jana Brike

@JANABRIKE

In her latest series, The Ebbs And Flows of Heartblood, the Latvian artist Jana Brike will leave you actually longing for the the scraped knees, baggy swimsuits, and armpit hair of your long lost post-pubescent summers. Be still my heart. 

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8.) Alex Gardner

@artposer

Alex's paintings should be made into an animated feature film, with no dialogue (since there are no mouths), featuring lots of dreamy hipster music by Californians. 

Left: Untitled & Right: Designer Sunglasses

NEW IMAGE ART GALLERY


9.) Monica Kim Garza

Follow: @MonicaKimGarza

Monica Kim seizes the female body from the likes of Matisse and Gauguin and forges a new a female gaze for our ridiculous era. 

Left: Whowww & Right: Avocado

NEW IMAGE ART GALLERY


10.) Andrea Canepa

Follow @galeria.rosa.santos (her gallery)

Andrea Canepa reorganizes and reimagines ordinary imagery and extraordinary ideas, making us see that we do not know what we think we know. 

From her artist statement: "This series of 365 drawings shows 365 streets in Latin America named after each date on the calendar. Each drawing shows the image of the street and a text with its name, its location, and a small paragraph that explains the event after which the street is named."

ROSA SANTOS GALLERY


 

11.) Jody Paulsen

Follow: @jody_paulsen

These massive felt pieces are incredible in real life. Pattern! Color! Pattern! Color! From Jody's artist statement: "Paulsen’s eye-popping creative output sequesters, multiplies, and reassembles the conventions of consumer society, offering viewers a glimpse of a far more individualized and fluid identity."

Left: Birdwoman & Right: Breezy

SMAC

 

12.) Mickalene Thomas

Follow: @mickalenethomas

Mickalene The Great reframes Black female identity. Long may she reign. Don't you also love her paintings

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Everyone Loves Kalena

YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY


13.) Rina Banerjee

Follow: @Rina.Banerjee

Born in India, raised in London, and now residing in New York—Rina Banerjee brings a global perspective to her art, a "willingness to close the gaps between cultures, communities, and places." But best of all, Rina's titles could be flash fiction in their own right.

 
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Title: All heart and wonder the future came to her like thunderous lava, she leaped while it seeped into places hostile and thence explosions placed her away from him, his anger waked her as survivor. 

HOSEFELT GALLERY

 

14.) Lissa Rivera

Follow: @lissa_rivera_

Lissa Rivera is fascinated by the evolution of identity, sexuality, and gender in relationship to material culture. The works below center on her partner, who poses in feminine dress. "It is important to show his femininity as strength. I want to feel empowered as well, and to have an intimate muse. Together we investigate feminine fantasies presented throughout the history of photography and cinema."


 

15.) Devan Shimoyama

Follow: @devanshimoyama

Devan's magical mix of neon, sequins, glitter, and rhinestones create masterful figurative paintings that explore both the celebration and silencing of queer culture and sexuality.

SOLO GALLERY


 

16.) Lava Thomas

Follow: @lavathomas

Lava's portraits weave together red hot feminist discourse, secular and religious ideas of the sacred, and African American devotional and protest traditions. Her portraits force us to reconsider the history we think we know.

Looking+Back+1_web.jpg

RENA BRANSTEN GALLERY


 

17.) Cornelia Baltes

Follow: @corneliabaltes

The economy, color, and humor behind these lovely paintings take inspiration from the every day, such as clothing, facial expressions, or a simple gesture.

Left: Rud & Right: Vell 

GALLERI NICOLAI WALLNER


 

18.) Bisa Butler

Follow: @bisabutler

Bisa's giant and beautiful quilts draw on the African American quilting tradition. From her artist statement: "My subjects are people I see every day. I have always been fascinated by the nobility of everyday people. They are the royalty who walk among us. We have known them from the days when the people could fly. My materials can be found in all of our closets."

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Anaya with Her Backback

CLAIRE OLIVER GALLERY


 

19.) Lisa Wright

Follow: @lisawrightart

Lisa's hot pink installation stopped Pulse showgoers in their tracks. This classically trained painter's genius use of color and abstraction toys with what her artist statement calls "the inevitable and irresistible desire to escape prepubescence with the trying on of the adult person."

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COATES AND SCARRY GALLERY


 

20.) Betty Tompkins

@bettytompkinsarts

The word iconic follows Betty Tompkins around. A woman once scorned by the feminist movement for her "pornographic" source material now deserves her rightful throne as our art queen. If you've read this far, do yourself a favor and read the words on these paintings carefully. 

Left: Women Words #51 (da Vinci)  //  Right: Women Words #40 (Mantegno)

P.P.O.W.

 

Scott Disick or no Scott Disick, these
artists give me hope for 2018.


Meghan Murphy's nights are spent at her drawing desk. Her days are divided between working as the creative director of Pollen Midwest and volunteering as editor-in-chief of Paper Darts. Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Website

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