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A Beginner's Guide to Gif Artists: Volume 4

Every time I’m ready to take a break from beating the gif art drum, I peer in my bookmarks and see a dozen more superstars waiting to be adored by you. Can’t stop won’t stop and all that.

The alien:
Charles Huettner

Charles Huettner is an illustrator who kicks ass at drawing cute creatures—humanoid but often not human—and bringing them to life as animations. If you spend a bit of some time on his Tumblr, you’ll grow close to his odd creations, then suffer disappointment when you find out how many of them come from his abandoned short film concepts.

The fashionista:
Tara Dougans

Fashion illustrations have been flooding my preferred blogs lately, and I couldn’t be more pleased. In particular, the work of Tara Dougans really stood out. Its not only marvelous—it moves. She takes already-bizarre men’s fashion and makes it somehow even more hypnotizing, and that’s a serious task.

 

The everyday:
Thorka Maer

Thorka Maer illustrates simple lives simply. And I do not mean that in a negative way. She records her observational humor with colored pencil (and Photoshop) in a manner that’s charmingly analog in the midst of the gifosphere. Her It’s No Biggie project is the perfect thing to metaphorically shrug on on a rainy day.

  

 

The question mark:
40 Licks

I wish I could tell you more about 40 Licks. I suppose they’re a Rolling Stones fan? Their gifs run the gamut from basic cinemagraph-style animation to collage to pixel art to stereoscopy to other words I haven’t learned yet. Their general inconsistency is part of their charm; there’s no way to know what’s coming next. 

The neon:
James Jirat Patradoon

It’s hard to put my finger on whether James Jirat Patradoon’s gifs are hard or easy on the eyes. His art is all steampunk and sass, like some kind of ceaseless ’80s mashup set to throbbing techno beats. It’s got macho shapes and feminine colors, and overall I rate it double plus good.

Five Reasons to Read Edith Wharton

Sally Franson vs. Ruth Reichl