Spaghetti Toes

Spaghetti Toes (a.k.a. Marty Bruckner) is inspired by the silly words of his young daughter. The wise one-liners of a two-year-old girl have been brought to life through Spaghetti Toes' drawings. Each silly nugget of knowledge has been preserved through his artwork. Since the beginning of this collection, Spaghetti Toes has been able to illustrate for people all over the world, taking their children's knowledge and adding to the encyclopedia of sayings. Spend some time with the monsters, princesses, superheroes, and super silliness that is Spaghetti Toes. 

Dominic Beyeler

Dominic Beyeler's prolific style can be seen in his daily sketches. Balancing bold colors and swift lines, Beyeler captures a fierce vulnerability within every face. Residing in Switzerland, Beyeler remembers the first time he earned money for his artwork, which secured his interest in being a professional artist: the splatter, the ink, our hearts. 

C. M. Kosemen

Originally from Turkey, Kosemen is a creative and inventive explorer. This talented artist blends elements of evolution, mythology, biology, natural history, and the EXTRAORDINARY. Kosemen's work is not only beautiful, but informative. Each drawing is a true interpretation of what the creatures may have looked like, where they lived, and how big they were. 

Joan Casaramona Gual

Dig under your mattress, the back of the closet, from the depths of your desk. Gather up all your doodle notebooks and get ready to drool over the ink stained pages of Joan Casaramona Gual. This Barcelona based artist fills pages and pages with his round faced ladies and the many other characters that inhabit his brain.

Holly Lucero

Holly Lucero knows the world is full of monsters, so she doesn't shy away from the beastly. Her illustrations encapsulate a landscape all their own, quite literally. A little gross, but oh so good.

Shawna Gilmore

The following paintings are drawn from the deep winter-forged well of Shawna Gilmore's overactive imagination. Her eclectic folk-style brings together her love for vintage photography, nature, mysticism, metaphors, fairytales, science, and humor. Steal away to the dream-scapes and mystical forests. These lovely forms of escapism make us reach for a telescope, a sword, and a bouquet of flowers. 

Larissa de Jesus

Originally from Puerto Rico, Larissa de Jesus is currently a student at Hunter College. Her work blends elements of photography and painting. Larissa loves images that bathe the human form in color and light. 

DANIELA TIENI

The illustrator Daniela Tieni works and lives in Rome, but she pulls from otherworldly inspiration. Through her imagination, women's bodies morph and fold and twist into something new.

Daniel Stolle

Meet Daniel Stolle! This German born, Finland residing artist holds on to the possibility that aliens might exist. Dreaming in bold yellows, Stolle begins his work as simple pencil and paper sketches that culminate in bold digital pieces. 

Eero Lampinen

Eero Lampinen is a Helsinki-based illustrator who works with ink, brushes, watercolor and a dreamy digital color palette. His characters seem to inhabit an alternate reality. Let's dive into that reality head-first, shall we?

David McMillan

David McMillan is a Belfast-based artist who has left his mark within the city through his mural work. You can find his bold colors and uniquly identifiable figures throughout the city. And if you can't swing the ticket to Ireland, check out more of his artwork here!

Isabelle Feliu

We see the best versions of our outfitted selves in the work of the illustrator Isabelle Feliu. She draws women in clothes that feel alive, real, and playful.

Jaime Jacob

Netherlands based illustrator, Jaime Jacob builds her work layer by layer. Many of pieces pay homage to her love of movies. Starting with black ink, then scanning in and adding color digitally, Jacob draws inspiration from vintage travel posters and childhood book covers. Each piece holds a story-like quality. With creatures and creepers, witches, and plants weaving their way through her work.

Keith Negley

Have you ever looked over at a New York Times' illustration and thought, "Wow, I really love that?" The illustration was probably Keith Negley's. This Washington-based illustrator is a powerhouse. His work is often featured in publications across the country, and also has two of his own books available. Wrought with emotion, his illustrations often break the stereotype of macho men, reminding us all that we're human and it's okay to cry.

Alexandra Dvornikova

Alexandra Dvornikova's work is steeped in Russian folklore. Beautiful and haunting, her work takes you to the middle of a forest, deep in the dark of night, and asks you to wander there alone. We want to know everything we can about this forest of serene and cerebral ladies. Each illustration deserves a novel's worth of a story behind it—and maybe an orchestral score too.

Karol Banach

Karol Banach is a Polish illustrator obsessed with hip hop listener, coffee, and tattoos. While we are guessing those are common interests among millennial illustrators, Karol is uncommonly good. 

Jeannie Phan

Jeannie Phan is an art director's dream. Phan is an illustrator at the top of her game, working with some of the finest publications in the land. In her capable hands—complex, wonky, and sensitive material magically morphs into a modern and evocative image. In an era where journalism has never mattered more, we need artists like Phan to keep readers on the ready. Browsing through her portfolio forces you to reckon with some of the most pressing conversations of our time on death, gender, sickness, work, and diversity. 

Ahra Kwon

Graphic design, photography, illustration, Ahra Kwon can do it all. Sparse and sharp, with a calming and modern color palette, the world simply needs more of Kwon's work.